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Posts tagged with ‘gas prices’

Lower gas prices = vacations


Lower gas prices have probably been encouraging you to go ahead and think about taking that road trip you’ve been dreaming about. The percentage of people who reported gas prices were affecting their travel plans dropped this past month.


While traveling by car is almost always cheaper than flying, gas prices are still high enough that road trippers will budget the cost of gas when planning their trip. A great app to use to help budget your spending on gas is Cost2Drive, which calculates gas costs based on your specific car and also tells you the cheapest places to stop for a fill-up on your trip.

Lower gas prices = vacations

Lower gas prices have probably been encouraging you to go ahead and think about taking that road trip you’ve been dreaming about. The percentage of people who reported gas prices were affecting their travel plans dropped this past month.

While traveling by car is almost always cheaper than flying, gas prices are still high enough that road trippers will budget the cost of gas when planning their trip. A great app to use to help budget your spending on gas is Cost2Drive, which calculates gas costs based on your specific car and also tells you the cheapest places to stop for a fill-up on your trip.

4 ways to save on gas in college
Unexpected college costs like gas prices can kill your wallet.
“Did I really just pay $60 to fill up a Corolla when I used to pay $20?” asks Sarah Glass, a senior at MidAmerica Nazarene University.
But fuel costs don’t have to break the bank. Here are some ways to save:
·         Park it. The easiest way to save on gas is to limit driving. Use free intercampus shuttle services or subsidized buses. See if you can get a student discount on public transportation. Walk or ride a bike if that’s an option.
·         Carpool. Sharing a ride with just one friend cuts gas costs in half. If you’re heading out of town, see if your campus has a ride board that connects student drivers with others headed to popular destinations. If you’re commuting to campus, see if your school provides parking spaces at reduced fees for students who share rides.
·         Get the GasBuddy app for free and find the lowest prices on gas in your area. The app can help you save anywhere from 20 to 40 cents per gallon.
·         Drive slowly and safely. According to Edmunds, drivers who slowly accelerate and decelerate can knock as much as 37 percent off fuel costs. The faster you drive, the more gas you burn. Going the speed limit saves drivers an average of an additional 12 percent on fuel.

4 ways to save on gas in college

Unexpected college costs like gas prices can kill your wallet.

“Did I really just pay $60 to fill up a Corolla when I used to pay $20?” asks Sarah Glass, a senior at MidAmerica Nazarene University.

But fuel costs don’t have to break the bank. Here are some ways to save:

·         Park it. The easiest way to save on gas is to limit driving. Use free intercampus shuttle services or subsidized buses. See if you can get a student discount on public transportation. Walk or ride a bike if that’s an option.

·         Carpool. Sharing a ride with just one friend cuts gas costs in half. If you’re heading out of town, see if your campus has a ride board that connects student drivers with others headed to popular destinations. If you’re commuting to campus, see if your school provides parking spaces at reduced fees for students who share rides.

·         Get the GasBuddy app for free and find the lowest prices on gas in your area. The app can help you save anywhere from 20 to 40 cents per gallon.

·         Drive slowly and safely. According to Edmunds, drivers who slowly accelerate and decelerate can knock as much as 37 percent off fuel costs. The faster you drive, the more gas you burn. Going the speed limit saves drivers an average of an additional 12 percent on fuel.

New mpg labels for cars from the EPA


The EPA unveiled a new gas mileage label for display in the window of every new car.


These labels will display more details on gas costs, emissions and other car-buying decision factors, such as:


·         Gas savings or costs over five years compared to the average new vehicle.
·         Ratings between one and 10 for greenhouse gases and smog.
·         A QR Code consumers can scan with a smartphone to get more information on a car.
·         The fuel consumption rate, or the amount of gas or electricity needed to drive 100 miles. This figure can help consumers compare gas, electric and hybrid vehicles.


What do you think of the new labels? Are they missing anything?

New mpg labels for cars from the EPA

The EPA unveiled a new gas mileage label for display in the window of every new car.

These labels will display more details on gas costs, emissions and other car-buying decision factors, such as:

·         Gas savings or costs over five years compared to the average new vehicle.

·         Ratings between one and 10 for greenhouse gases and smog.

·         A QR Code consumers can scan with a smartphone to get more information on a car.

·         The fuel consumption rate, or the amount of gas or electricity needed to drive 100 miles. This figure can help consumers compare gas, electric and hybrid vehicles.

What do you think of the new labels? Are they missing anything?

The upside to high gas prices

 
The cost of getting around is going up, but apparently high petrol prices have at least one perk.

 
According to research by Mississippi State’s Social Science Research Center published in the Journal of Safety Research and Accident Analysis and Prevention, car accidents are going down.

 
When prices at the pump are on the rise, people tend to drive less and drive more slowly.

 
The study also discovered a link between higher gas prices and the decrease in alcohol-related wrecks. 


But any savings you might have on your auto insurance premium will likely just flow back into your gas tank.

The upside to high gas prices

 

The cost of getting around is going up, but apparently high petrol prices have at least one perk.

 

According to research by Mississippi State’s Social Science Research Center published in the Journal of Safety Research and Accident Analysis and Prevention, car accidents are going down.

 

When prices at the pump are on the rise, people tend to drive less and drive more slowly.

 

The study also discovered a link between higher gas prices and the decrease in alcohol-related wrecks.

But any savings you might have on your auto insurance premium will likely just flow back into your gas tank.

Combat rising gas prices

Good ol’ gas prices seem to be steadily on the rise again.

If you’re not in a position to get a more fuel-efficient car or change to public transportation, then new road habits could give your miles per gallon a boost. Enter “hypermiling.”

Hypermiling is a term and concept introduced shortly after Sept. 11, 2001, when the price of oil spiked and people looked for a way to get more bang for their gas bill.

These 15 hypermiling techniques will slash fuel costs but won’t put drivers and passengers at risk.

1.       Slow down. The U.S. Department of Energy says most vehicles get their best fuel economy at speeds between 40 and 55 miles per hour. Efficiency decreases rapidly at speeds over 60 miles per hour.

2.       Check your tire pressure. Inflate tires to the maximum pressure on the tire’s sidewall. One less pound of tire pressure can lower fuel efficiency by 1.4 percent.

3.       Don’t let your car idle. Most car engines require only seven seconds of gas to restart, so consider turning off your car at long red lights or train track intersections.

4.       Maintain fluids and filters. Keeping your car properly maintained and tuned up is critical to fuel efficiency. Make sure you’re getting the proper amount of oil changes, new air filters, tire rotations and alignment.

5.       Plan your errands. When making trips around town, start with the farthest destination to ensure that your car gets fully warmed up before you begin making a number of starts and stops.

6.       Track miles per gallon. Calculate your gas mileage by resetting your trip odometer with every new full tank of gas. Divide the number of miles driven by the number of gallons it took to fill the tank.

7.       De-clutter your car. Additional weight requires more energy and gas to transport, so move unnecessary things from your car.

8.       Get rid of unused racks. If you’re not using your bike rack or luggage topper, remove them from your car. They create more drag and decrease fuel efficiency.

9.       Go with the flow. Traveling at a constant speed with the flow of traffic is more aerodynamically efficient than going the same speed in isolation. Uniform traffic flows generate wind current that can benefit your fuel economy.

10.   Time your tank’s refills. Plan to refuel your car during off-peak times to avoid idling in line.

11.   Ride in the open lanes. On a multi-lane highway, choose the most open lane and give yourself enough space to avoid sudden braking and changes in speed. In a more urban setting, avoid bus lanes and lanes where cars frequently slow down to turn.

12.   Keep sun and moon roof windows closed. At higher speeds, they create drag and reduce fuel efficiency.

13.   Drive shoeless. This allows for tactile feedback from the car and for better handling of the pedals.

14.   Avoid parallel parking. Pull in spots require less maneuvering and gas-burning.

15.   Park toward the back and enjoy a walk. Choose the back of parking spots to avoid excessive circling in attempt to get as close to the building or destination as possible.

Critics contend that hypermiling can be dangerous, as drivers go to extremes to conserve momentum – such as taking two-wheel turns and running red lights. Safety should always be the number one priority on the road, so any steps toward getting more miles for the gallon should be implemented within reason.